SPLASH 2022
Mon 5 - Sat 10 December 2022 Auckland, New Zealand

Programming environments that integrate tools, notations, and abstractions into a holistic user experience can provide programmers with better support for what they want to achieve. These programming environments can create an engaging place to do new forms of informational work - resulting in enjoyable, creative, and productive experiences with programming.

In the workshop on Programming Abstractions and Interactive Notations, Tools, and Environments (PAINT), we want to discuss programming environments that support users in working with and creating notations and abstractions that matter to them. We are interested in the relationship between people centric notations and general-purpose programming languages and environments. How do we reflect the various experiences, needs, and priorities of the many people involved in programming — whether they call it that or not?

Call for Papers

Introduction

Programming environments that integrate tools, notations, and abstractions into a holistic user experience can provide programmers with better support for what they want to achieve. These programming environments can create an engaging place to do new forms of informational work - resulting in enjoyable, creative, and productive experiences with programming.

Topics of Interest

In the workshop on Programming Abstractions and Interactive Notations, Tools, and Environments (PAINT), we want to discuss programming environments that support users in working with and creating notations and abstractions that matter to them. We are interested in the relationship between people centric notations and general-purpose programming languages and environments. How do we reflect the various experiences, needs, and priorities of the many people involved in programming — whether they call it that or not?

Areas of interest to PAINT include but are not limited to:

  • Design and implementation of program representations and their means of interaction for end-users of all ages
  • Design and implementation of visual programming environments
  • Block-based environments and their application
  • Projectional editors and their application
  • Languages and their environments with mixed notations
  • Meta tools or tool creation frameworks
  • Methods to support working with abstractions, such as example-based programming
  • Input and output devices for interacting with programming environments
  • Theories of the above

Format

The actual format of PAINT will depend on it being held hybrid or online. Remote participation will be ensured.

We plan to organize the workshop as a one-day workshop (or up to two days with shorter slots if online) as a combination of short presentations and demos combined with structured feedback inspired by the Writer’s Workshop format:

  • Participants are expected to have visited the materials beforehand.
  • A moderator leads and directs the discussion.
  • We review the pieces and their ideas one at a time.
  • In general, the authors whose work is under review are silent.
  • When discussing form, the following kinds of questions will be asked:
    • What did you gather / understand from the piece?
    • What aspects of the piece worked well to present the ideas?
    • What aspects need improvement? (These comments must be in the form of suggestions, not criticisms.)
  • When discussing the ideas, the following kinds of questions will be asked:
    • What are the ideas?
    • Which ideas seem like good ones (and why)?
    • Which ideas need improvement or elimination? (Make positive suggestions when you can.)
  • At the end the authors ask questions of the group.

This is the basic format, but we adjust the flow according to the needs of the group and the way the discussion is going. It is formal to ensure all the important points are covered.

For more information about the workshop format, please have a look at Richard P. Gabriel’s book “Writers’ Workshops & the World of Making Things”.

Types of Submissions

PAINT welcomes two types of contributions:

  • Research papers should present new, previously unpublished research in one or more of the topics described above. Six to eight pages might be considered a good target for the contributions expected at PAINT. However, there is no page limit on submitted papers. As a general rule, the number of pages should match the size of the contribution. It is the responsibility of the authors to keep the reviewers interested and motivated to read the paper. Reviewers are under no obligation to read all or even a substantial portion of a paper if they do not find the initial part of it interesting.

  • Demos show early implementations of novel and compelling tools, techniques, devices, and systems. Submissions should be in the form of a video no longer than 5 minutes that participants can watch prior to the workshop and then discuss.

Publication

Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

(To be confirmed: Proceedings will be post-workshop to give authors the opportunity to incorporate feedback obtained at the workshop.)