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SPLASH 2022
Mon 5 - Sat 10 December 2022 Auckland, New Zealand

PACMPL Issue OOPSLA 2022 seeks contributions on all aspects of programming languages and software engineering. Authors of papers published in PACMPL Issue OOPSLA 2022 will be invited to present their work in the OOPSLA track of the SPLASH conference in December.

Papers may target any stage of software development, including requirements, modeling, prototyping, design, implementation, generation, analysis, verification, testing, evaluation, maintenance, and reuse of software systems. Contributions may include the development of new tools (such as language front-ends, program analyses, and runtime systems), new techniques (such as methodologies, design processes, and code organization approaches), new principles (such as formalisms, proofs, models, and paradigms), and new evaluations (such as experiments, corpora analyses, user studies, and surveys).

Dates
Plenary
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Thu 8 Dec

Displayed time zone: Auckland, Wellington change

10:00 - 10:30
10:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

10:30 - 12:00
10:30
30m
Research paper
Complexity-guided container replacement synthesis
OOPSLA
Chengpeng Wang Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peisen Yao Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Wensheng Tang Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Qingkai Shi Ant Group, Charles Zhang Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
Katara: Synthesizing CRDTs with Verified Lifting
OOPSLA
Shadaj Laddad University of California at Berkeley, Conor Power University of California at Berkeley, Mae Milano University of California at Berkeley, Alvin Cheung University of California at Berkeley, Joseph M. Hellerstein University of California at Berkeley
DOI
11:30
30m
Talk
Specification-Guided Component-Based Synthesis from Effectful Libraries
OOPSLA
Ashish Mishra Purdue University, Suresh Jagannathan Purdue University
DOI
10:30 - 12:00
10:30
30m
Research paper
C to checked C by 3c
OOPSLA
Aravind Machiry Purdue University, John Kastner Amazon, Matt McCutchen , Aaron Eline Amazon, Kyle Headley Amazon, MIchael Hicks Amazon
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
Solo: A Lightweight Static Analysis for Differential Privacy
OOPSLA
Chike Abuah University of Vermont, David Darais Galois, Joseph P. Near University of Vermont
DOI
11:30
30m
Talk
MLstruct: Principal Type Inference in a Boolean Algebra of Structural Types
OOPSLA
Lionel Parreaux Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Chun Yin Chau The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
DOI Pre-print
12:00 - 13:30
12:00
90m
Lunch
Lunch
Catering and Social Events

15:00 - 15:30
15:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

15:30 - 17:00
15:30
30m
Talk
A Bunch of Sessions: A Propositions-as-Sessions Interpretation of Bunched Implications in Channel-Based Concurrency
OOPSLA
Dan Frumin University of Groningen, Emanuele D’Osualdo MPI-SWS, Bas van den Heuvel University of Groningen, Jorge A. Pérez University of Groningen
DOI Pre-print
16:00
30m
Talk
A case for DOT: Theoretical Foundations for Objects with Pattern Matching and GADT-Style Reasoning
OOPSLA
Aleksander Boruch-Gruszecki EPFL, Radosław Waśko University of Warsaw, Yichen Xu Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Lionel Parreaux Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
Coeffects for Sharing and Mutation
OOPSLA
Riccardo Bianchini University of Genoa, Francesco Dagnino University of Genoa, Paola Giannini University of Eastern Piedmont, Elena Zucca University of Genoa, Marco Servetto Victoria University of Wellington
DOI
15:30 - 17:00
15:30
30m
Talk
Compilation of Dynamic Sparse Tensor Algebra
OOPSLA
Stephen Chou Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Saman Amarasinghe Massachusetts Institute of Technology
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Incremental Type-Checking for Free: Using Scope Graphs to Derive Incremental Type-Checkers
OOPSLA
Aron Zwaan Delft University of Technology, Hendrik van Antwerpen Delft University of Technology, Eelco Visser Delft University of Technology
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
UniRec: A Unimodular-Like Framework for Nested Recursions and Loops
OOPSLA
Kirshanthan Sundararajah Purdue University, Charitha Saumya Purdue University, Milind Kulkarni Purdue University
DOI
15:30 - 17:00
VerificationOOPSLA at Seminar Room G007
15:30
30m
Talk
Checking Equivalence in a Non-strict Language
OOPSLA
John C. Kolesar Yale University, Ruzica Piskac Yale University, William T. Hallahan Yale University
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Necessity Specifications for Robustness
OOPSLA
Julian Mackay Victoria University of Wellington, Susan Eisenbach Imperial College London, James Noble Research & Programming, Sophia Drossopoulou Meta and Imperial College London
DOI
16:30
30m
Research paper
Quantitative strongest post: a calculus for reasoning about the flow of quantitative information
OOPSLA
Linpeng Zhang University College London, Benjamin Lucien Kaminski Saarland University and University College London
DOI

Fri 9 Dec

Displayed time zone: Auckland, Wellington change

10:00 - 10:30
10:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

10:30 - 12:00
BlockchainOOPSLA at AMRF Auditorium
10:30
30m
Talk
A Study of Inline Assembly in Solidity Smart Contracts
OOPSLA
Stefanos Chaliasos Imperial College London, Arthur Gervais Imperial College London, Ben Livshits Imperial College London
DOI
11:00
30m
Research paper
Elipmoc: advanced decompilation of Ethereum smart contracts
OOPSLA
Neville Grech University of Malta, Sifis Lagouvardos University of Athens, Ilias Tsatiris University of Athens, Yannis Smaragdakis University of Athens
DOI
11:30
30m
Talk
SigVM: Enabling Event-Driven Execution for Truly Decentralized Smart Contracts
OOPSLA
Zihan Zhao University of Toronto, Sidi Mohamed Beillahi University of Toronto, Ryan Song University of Toronto, Yuxi Cai University of Toronto, Andreas Veneris University of Toronto, Fan Long University of Toronto
DOI
10:30 - 12:00
Synthesis IIOOPSLA at Lecture Theatre 2
10:30
30m
Talk
Neural Architecture Search using Property Guided Synthesis
OOPSLA
Charles Jin Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Phitchaya Mangpo Phothilimthana Google Research, Sudip Roy Cohere.ai
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
Synthesizing Axiomatizations using Logic Learning
OOPSLA
Paul Krogmeier University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Zhengyao Lin University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Adithya Murali University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, P. Madhusudan University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI
11:30
30m
Research paper
Synthesizing fine-grained synchronization protocols for implicit monitors
OOPSLA
Kostas Ferles Veridise Inc., Benjamin Sepanski The University of Texas at Austin, Rahul Krishnan UT Austin, James Bornholt University of Texas at Austin, Işil Dillig University of Texas at Austin
DOI
10:30 - 12:00
Semantics and SecurityOOPSLA at Seminar Room G007
10:30
30m
Research paper
Le Temps des Cerises: Efficient Temporal Stack Safety on Capability Machines using Directed Capabilities
OOPSLA
Aina Linn Georges Aarhus University, Alix Trieu ANSSI, Lars Birkedal Aarhus University
DOI
11:00
30m
Research paper
Plausible sealing for gradual parametricity
OOPSLA
Elizabeth Labrada University of Chile, Matías Toro University of Chile, Éric Tanter University of Chile, Dominique Devriese KU Leuven
DOI
11:30
30m
Research paper
Purity of an ST monad: full abstraction by semantically typed back-translation
OOPSLA
Koen Jacobs KU Leuven, Dominique Devriese KU Leuven, Amin Timany Aarhus University
DOI
12:00 - 13:30
12:00
90m
Lunch
Lunch
Catering and Social Events

13:30 - 15:00
Logic and Verification IOOPSLA at AMRF Auditorium
13:30
30m
Research paper
Finding real bugs in big programs with incorrectness logic
OOPSLA
Quang Loc Le University College London, Azalea Raad Imperial College London, Jules Villard Meta, Josh Berdine Meta, Derek Dreyer MPI-SWS, Peter W. O'Hearn Meta; University College London
DOI
14:00
30m
Talk
Fractional Resources in Unbounded Separation Logic
OOPSLA
Thibault Dardinier ETH Zurich, Peter Müller ETH Zurich, Alexander J. Summers University of British Columbia
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Proving Hypersafety Compositionally
OOPSLA
Emanuele D’Osualdo MPI-SWS, Azadeh Farzan University of Toronto, Derek Dreyer MPI-SWS
DOI Pre-print
13:30 - 15:00
13:30
30m
Research paper
Bugs in Quantum computing platforms: an empirical study
OOPSLA
Matteo Paltenghi University of Stuttgart, Germany, Michael Pradel University of Stuttgart
DOI
14:00
30m
Talk
Tower: Data Structures in Quantum Superposition
OOPSLA
Charles Yuan Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Michael Carbin Massachusetts Institute of Technology
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Verified Compilation of Quantum Oracles
OOPSLA
Liyi Li University of Maryland, Finn Voichick University of Maryland, Kesha Hietala University of Maryland, Yuxiang Peng University of Maryland, Xiaodi Wu University of Maryland, Michael Hicks University of Maryland; Amazon
DOI
13:30 - 15:00
13:30
30m
Talk
AnICA: Analyzing Inconsistencies in Microarchitectural Code Analyzers
OOPSLA
Fabian Ritter Saarland University, Germany, Sebastian Hack Saarland University, Germany
DOI
14:00
30m
Talk
Highly Illogical, Kirk: Spotting Type Mismatches in the Large Despite Broken Contracts, Unsound Types, and Too Many Linters
OOPSLA
Joshua Hoeflich Northwestern University, Robby Findler Northwestern University, Manuel Serrano Inria; University of Côte d'Azur
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Seq2Parse: Neurosymbolic Parse Error Repair
OOPSLA
Georgios Sakkas University of California at San Diego, Madeline Endres University of Michigan, Philip J. Guo University of California at San Diego, Westley Weimer University of Michigan, Ranjit Jhala University of California at San Diego
DOI
15:00 - 15:30
15:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

15:30 - 17:00
Systems and VerificationOOPSLA at AMRF Auditorium
15:30
30m
Talk
BFF: Foundational and Automated Verification of Bitfield-Manipulating Programs
OOPSLA
Fengmin Zhu MPI-SWS, Michael Sammler MPI-SWS, Rodolphe Lepigre MPI-SWS, Derek Dreyer MPI-SWS, Deepak Garg MPI-SWS
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Compositional Virtual Timelines: Verifying Dynamic-Priority Partitions with Algorithmic Temporal Isolation
OOPSLA
Mengqi Liu Yale University, Zhong Shao Yale University, Hao Chen Yale University, Man-Ki Yoon Yale University, Jung-Eun Kim Yale University
DOI
16:30
30m
Research paper
Linear types for large-scale systems verification
OOPSLA
Jialin Li , Andrea Lattuada ETH Zurich, Yi Zhou Carnegie Mellon University, Jonathan Cameron Carnegie Mellon University, Jon Howell VMWare Research, Bryan Parno Carnegie Mellon University, USA, Chris Hawblitzel Microsoft Research
DOI
15:30 - 17:00
15:30
30m
Research paper
Effects, capabilities, and boxes: from scope-based reasoning to type-based reasoning and back
OOPSLA
Jonathan Immanuel Brachthäuser University of Tübingen, Philipp Schuster University of Tübingen, Edward Lee University of Waterloo, Aleksander Boruch-Gruszecki EPFL
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
First-class Names for Effect Handlers
OOPSLA
Ningning Xie University of Cambridge / University of Toronto, Youyou Cong Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kazuki Ikemori Tokyo Institute of Technology, Daan Leijen Microsoft Research
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
High-Level Effect Handlers in C++
OOPSLA
Dan Ghica Huawei, Sam Lindley University of Edinburgh, Marcos Maronas Bravo Huawei, Maciej Piróg Huawei
DOI
15:30 - 17:00
ProbabilisticOOPSLA at Seminar Room G007
15:30
30m
Talk
Semi-symbolic Inference for Efficient Streaming Probabilistic Programming
OOPSLA
Eric Atkinson Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Charles Yuan Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Guillaume Baudart Inria, Louis Mandel IBM Research, Michael Carbin Massachusetts Institute of Technology
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Symbolic Execution for Randomized Programs
OOPSLA
Zachary Susag Cornell University, Sumit Lahiri IIT Kanpur, Justin Hsu Cornell University, Subhajit Roy IIT Kanpur
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
This Is the Moment for Probabilistic Loops
OOPSLA
DOI

Sat 10 Dec

Displayed time zone: Auckland, Wellington change

10:00 - 10:30
10:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

10:30 - 12:00
Logic and ConcurrencyOOPSLA at AMRF Auditorium
10:30
30m
Talk
A Concurrent Program Logic with a Future and History
OOPSLA
Roland Meyer TU Braunschweig, Thomas Wies New York University, Sebastian Wolff New York University
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
CAAT: Consistency as a Theory
OOPSLA
Thomas Haas TU Braunschweig, Roland Meyer TU Braunschweig, Hernán Ponce de León Huawei Dresden Research Center
DOI
11:30
30m
Talk
Implementing and Verifying Release-Acquire Transactional Memory in C11
OOPSLA
Sadegh Dalvandi University of Surrey, Brijesh Dongol University of Surrey
DOI
10:30 - 12:00
10:30
30m
Talk
Data-Driven Lemma Synthesis for Interactive Proofs
OOPSLA
Aishwarya Sivaraman University of California at Los Angeles, Alex Sanchez-Stern University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Bretton Chen University of California at Los Angeles, Sorin Lerner University of California at San Diego, Todd Millstein University of California at Los Angeles
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
Intrinsically-Typed Definitional Interpreters à la Carte
OOPSLA
Cas van der Rest Delft University of Technology, Casper Bach Poulsen Delft University of Technology, Arjen Rouvoet Delft University of Technology, Eelco Visser Delft University of Technology, Peter D. Mosses Swansea University and Delft University of Technology
DOI
11:30
30m
Research paper
Proof transfer for fast certification of multiple approximate neural networks
OOPSLA
Shubham Ugare University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Gagandeep Singh University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Sasa Misailovic University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI
10:30 - 12:00
10:30
30m
Talk
Can Guided Decomposition Help End-Users Write Larger Block-Based Programs? A Mobile Robot Experiment
OOPSLA
Nico Ritschel University of British Columbia, Felipe Fronchetti Virginia Commonwealth University, Reid Holmes University of British Columbia, Ronald Garcia University of British Columbia, David C. Shepherd Virginia Commonwealth University
DOI
11:00
30m
Talk
Compositional Embeddings of Domain-Specific Languages
OOPSLA
Yaozhu Sun University of Hong Kong, Utkarsh Dhandhania University of Hong Kong, Bruno C. d. S. Oliveira University of Hong Kong
DOI Pre-print
11:30
30m
Research paper
Language-parametric static semantic code completion
OOPSLA
Daniel A. A. Pelsmaeker Delft University of Technology, Netherlands, Hendrik van Antwerpen Delft University of Technology, Casper Bach Poulsen Delft University of Technology, Eelco Visser Delft University of Technology
DOI
12:00 - 13:30
12:00
90m
Lunch
Lunch
Catering and Social Events

13:30 - 15:00
Testing and MaintenanceOOPSLA at AMRF Auditorium
13:30
30m
Talk
Overwatch: Learning Patterns in Code Edit Sequences
OOPSLA
Yuhao Zhang University of Wisconsin-Madison, Yasharth Bajpai Microsoft, Priyanshu Gupta Microsoft, Ameya Ketkar Uber, Miltiadis Allamanis Microsoft Research, Titus Barik Microsoft, Sumit Gulwani Microsoft, Arjun Radhakrishna Microsoft, Mohammad Raza Microsoft, Gustavo Soares Microsoft, Ashish Tiwari Microsoft
DOI
14:00
30m
Talk
Satisfiability Modulo Fuzzing: A Synergistic Combination of SMT Solving and Fuzzing
OOPSLA
Sujit Kumar Muduli IIT Kanpur, Subhajit Roy IIT Kanpur
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Synthesizing Code Quality Rules from Examples
OOPSLA
DOI
13:30 - 15:00
13:30
30m
Research paper
C4: verified transactional objects
OOPSLA
Mohsen Lesani University of California at Riverside, Li-yao Xia University of Pennsylvania, Anders Kaseorg Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Christian J. Bell MIT CSAIL, Adam Chlipala Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Benjamin C. Pierce University of Pennsylvania, Steve Zdancewic University of Pennsylvania
DOI
14:00
30m
Talk
Concurrent Size
OOPSLA
Gal Sela Technion, Erez Petrank Technion
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Veracity: Declarative Multicore Programming with Commutativity
OOPSLA
Adam Chen Stevens Institute of Technology, Parisa Fathololumi Stevens Institute of Technology, Eric Koskinen Stevens Institute of Technology, Jared Pincus Stevens Institute of Technology
DOI
13:30 - 15:00
Logic and Verification IIOOPSLA at Seminar Room G007
13:30
30m
Research paper
On incorrectness logic for Quantum programs
OOPSLA
Peng Yan University of Technology Sydney, Hanru Jiang Yanqi Lake Beijing Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Applications, China, Nengkun Yu Stony Brook University, USA
DOI
14:00
30m
Research paper
Weighted programming: a programming paradigm for specifying mathematical models
OOPSLA
Kevin Batz RWTH Aachen University, Adrian Gallus RWTH Aachen University, Benjamin Lucien Kaminski Saarland University and University College London, Joost-Pieter Katoen RWTH Aachen University, Tobias Winkler RWTH Aachen University
DOI
14:30
30m
Talk
Wildcards Need Witness Protection
OOPSLA
DOI
15:00 - 15:30
15:00
30m
Coffee break
Coffee break
Catering and Social Events

15:30 - 17:00
15:30
30m
Research paper
Functional collection programming with semi-ring dictionaries
OOPSLA
Amir Shaikhha University of Edinburgh, Mathieu Huot Oxford University, Jaclyn Smith Oxford University, Dan Olteanu University of Zurich
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Indexing the Extended Dyck-CFL Reachability for Context-Sensitive Program Analysis
OOPSLA
Qingkai Shi Ant Group, Yongchao WANG Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peisen Yao Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Charles Zhang Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
The Essence of Online Data Processing
OOPSLA
Philip Dexter SUNY Binghamton, Yu David Liu SUNY Binghamton, Kenneth Chiu SUNY Binghamton
DOI
15:30 - 17:00
Synthesis IIIOOPSLA at Lecture Theatre 2
15:30
30m
Research paper
Automated transpilation of imperative to functional code using neural-guided program synthesis
OOPSLA
Benjamin Mariano University of Texas at Austin, Yanju Chen University of California at Santa Barbara, Yu Feng University of California at Santa Barbara, Greg Durrett University of Texas at Austin, Işil Dillig University of Texas at Austin
DOI
16:00
30m
Talk
Synthesis-Powered Optimization of Smart Contracts via Data Type Refactoring
OOPSLA
Yanju Chen University of California at Santa Barbara, Yuepeng Wang Simon Fraser University, Maruth Goyal University of Texas at Austin, James Dong Stanford University, Yu Feng University of California at Santa Barbara, Işil Dillig University of Texas at Austin
DOI
16:30
30m
Talk
Synthesizing Abstract Transformers
OOPSLA
Pankaj Kumar Kalita IIT Kanpur, Sujit Kumar Muduli IIT Kanpur, Loris D'Antoni University of Wisconsin-Madison, Thomas Reps University of Wisconsin-Madison, Subhajit Roy IIT Kanpur
DOI
Hide past events

Not scheduled yet

Not scheduled yet
Research paper
End-to-end translation validation for the halide language
OOPSLA
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
Model-Guided Synthesis of Inductive Lemmas for FOL with Least Fixpoints
OOPSLA
Adithya Murali University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Lucas Peña University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Eion Blanchard University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Christof Löding RWTH Aachen University, P. Madhusudan University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
A General Construction for Abstract Interpretation of Higher-Order Automatic Differentiation
OOPSLA
Jacob Laurel University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Rem Yang University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Shubham Ugare University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Robert Nagel University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Gagandeep Singh University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Sasa Misailovic University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
Parsing Randomness
OOPSLA
Harrison Goldstein University of Pennsylvania, Benjamin C. Pierce University of Pennsylvania
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
Bridging the Semantic Gap between Qualitative and Quantitative Models of Distributed Systems
OOPSLA
Si Liu ETH Zurich, Jose Meseguer University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Peter Ölveczky University of Oslo, Min Zhang East China Normal University, David Basin ETH Zurich
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Research paper
Applying cognitive principles to model-finding output: the positive value of negative information
OOPSLA
Tristan Dyer , Tim Nelson Brown University, Kathi Fisler Brown University, Shriram Krishnamurthi Brown University, United States
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
Scalable Verification of GNN-Based Job Schedulers
OOPSLA
Haoze Wu Stanford University, Clark Barrett Stanford University, Mahmood Sharif Tel Aviv University, Nina Narodytska VMware Research, Gagandeep Singh University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
A Conceptual Framework for Safe Object Initialization
OOPSLA
Clément Blaudeau Inria, Fengyun Liu Oracle Labs
DOI
Not scheduled yet
Talk
Fast Shadow Execution for Debugging Numerical Errors using Error Free Transformations
OOPSLA
Sangeeta Chowdhary Rutgers University, Santosh Nagarakatte Rutgers University
DOI Pre-print
Not scheduled yet
Research paper
Translating canonical SQL to imperative code in Coq
OOPSLA
Véronique Benzaken Université Paris-Saclay - Laboratoire de Méthodes Formelles , Evelyne Contejean , Houssem Hachmaoui , Chantal Keller LRI, Université Paris-Sud, Louis Mandel IBM Research, Avraham Shinnar IBM Research, Jerome Simeon DocuSign, Inc.
DOI

Accepted Papers

Title
A Bunch of Sessions: A Propositions-as-Sessions Interpretation of Bunched Implications in Channel-Based Concurrency
OOPSLA
DOI Pre-print
A case for DOT: Theoretical Foundations for Objects with Pattern Matching and GADT-Style Reasoning
OOPSLA
DOI
A Conceptual Framework for Safe Object Initialization
OOPSLA
DOI
A Concurrent Program Logic with a Future and History
OOPSLA
DOI
A Fast In-Place Interpreter for WebAssembly
OOPSLA
DOI
A General Construction for Abstract Interpretation of Higher-Order Automatic Differentiation
OOPSLA
DOI
AnICA: Analyzing Inconsistencies in Microarchitectural Code Analyzers
OOPSLA
DOI
Applying cognitive principles to model-finding output: the positive value of negative information
OOPSLA
DOI
A Study of Inline Assembly in Solidity Smart Contracts
OOPSLA
DOI
Automated transpilation of imperative to functional code using neural-guided program synthesis
OOPSLA
DOI
BFF: Foundational and Automated Verification of Bitfield-Manipulating Programs
OOPSLA
DOI
Bridging the Semantic Gap between Qualitative and Quantitative Models of Distributed Systems
OOPSLA
DOI
Bugs in Quantum computing platforms: an empirical study
OOPSLA
DOI
C4: verified transactional objects
OOPSLA
DOI
CAAT: Consistency as a Theory
OOPSLA
DOI
Can Guided Decomposition Help End-Users Write Larger Block-Based Programs? A Mobile Robot Experiment
OOPSLA
DOI
Checking Equivalence in a Non-strict Language
OOPSLA
DOI
Coeffects for Sharing and Mutation
OOPSLA
DOI
Compilation of Dynamic Sparse Tensor Algebra
OOPSLA
DOI
Complexity-guided container replacement synthesis
OOPSLA
DOI
Compositional Embeddings of Domain-Specific Languages
OOPSLA
DOI Pre-print
Compositional Virtual Timelines: Verifying Dynamic-Priority Partitions with Algorithmic Temporal Isolation
OOPSLA
DOI
Concurrent Size
OOPSLA
DOI
C to checked C by 3c
OOPSLA
DOI
Data-Driven Lemma Synthesis for Interactive Proofs
OOPSLA
DOI
Effects, capabilities, and boxes: from scope-based reasoning to type-based reasoning and back
OOPSLA
DOI
Elipmoc: advanced decompilation of Ethereum smart contracts
OOPSLA
DOI
End-to-end translation validation for the halide language
OOPSLA
DOI
Fast Shadow Execution for Debugging Numerical Errors using Error Free Transformations
OOPSLA
DOI Pre-print
Finding real bugs in big programs with incorrectness logic
OOPSLA
DOI
First-class Names for Effect Handlers
OOPSLA
DOI
Fractional Resources in Unbounded Separation Logic
OOPSLA
DOI
Functional collection programming with semi-ring dictionaries
OOPSLA
DOI
High-Level Effect Handlers in C++
OOPSLA
DOI
Highly Illogical, Kirk: Spotting Type Mismatches in the Large Despite Broken Contracts, Unsound Types, and Too Many Linters
OOPSLA
DOI
Implementing and Verifying Release-Acquire Transactional Memory in C11
OOPSLA
DOI
Incremental Type-Checking for Free: Using Scope Graphs to Derive Incremental Type-Checkers
OOPSLA
DOI
Indexing the Extended Dyck-CFL Reachability for Context-Sensitive Program Analysis
OOPSLA
DOI
Intrinsically-Typed Definitional Interpreters à la Carte
OOPSLA
DOI
Katara: Synthesizing CRDTs with Verified Lifting
OOPSLA
DOI
Language-parametric static semantic code completion
OOPSLA
DOI
Le Temps des Cerises: Efficient Temporal Stack Safety on Capability Machines using Directed Capabilities
OOPSLA
DOI
Linear types for large-scale systems verification
OOPSLA
DOI
MLstruct: Principal Type Inference in a Boolean Algebra of Structural Types
OOPSLA
DOI Pre-print
Model-Guided Synthesis of Inductive Lemmas for FOL with Least Fixpoints
OOPSLA
DOI
Necessity Specifications for Robustness
OOPSLA
DOI
Neural Architecture Search using Property Guided Synthesis
OOPSLA
DOI
On incorrectness logic for Quantum programs
OOPSLA
DOI
Optimal Heap Limits for Reducing Browser Memory Use
OOPSLA
DOI
Overwatch: Learning Patterns in Code Edit Sequences
OOPSLA
DOI
Parsing Randomness
OOPSLA
DOI
Plausible sealing for gradual parametricity
OOPSLA
DOI
Proof transfer for fast certification of multiple approximate neural networks
OOPSLA
DOI
Proving Hypersafety Compositionally
OOPSLA
DOI Pre-print
Purity of an ST monad: full abstraction by semantically typed back-translation
OOPSLA
DOI
Quantitative strongest post: a calculus for reasoning about the flow of quantitative information
OOPSLA
DOI
Satisfiability Modulo Fuzzing: A Synergistic Combination of SMT Solving and Fuzzing
OOPSLA
DOI
Scalable Verification of GNN-Based Job Schedulers
OOPSLA
DOI
Semi-symbolic Inference for Efficient Streaming Probabilistic Programming
OOPSLA
DOI
Seq2Parse: Neurosymbolic Parse Error Repair
OOPSLA
DOI
SigVM: Enabling Event-Driven Execution for Truly Decentralized Smart Contracts
OOPSLA
DOI
Solo: A Lightweight Static Analysis for Differential Privacy
OOPSLA
DOI
Specification-Guided Component-Based Synthesis from Effectful Libraries
OOPSLA
DOI
Symbolic Execution for Randomized Programs
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesis-Powered Optimization of Smart Contracts via Data Type Refactoring
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesizing Abstract Transformers
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesizing Axiomatizations using Logic Learning
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesizing Code Quality Rules from Examples
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesizing fine-grained synchronization protocols for implicit monitors
OOPSLA
DOI
The Essence of Online Data Processing
OOPSLA
DOI
The Road Not Taken: Exploring Alias Analysis Based Optimizations Missed by the Compiler
OOPSLA
DOI
This Is the Moment for Probabilistic Loops
OOPSLA
DOI
Tower: Data Structures in Quantum Superposition
OOPSLA
DOI
Translating canonical SQL to imperative code in Coq
OOPSLA
DOI
UniRec: A Unimodular-Like Framework for Nested Recursions and Loops
OOPSLA
DOI
Veracity: Declarative Multicore Programming with Commutativity
OOPSLA
DOI
Verified Compilation of Quantum Oracles
OOPSLA
DOI
Weighted programming: a programming paradigm for specifying mathematical models
OOPSLA
DOI
Wildcards Need Witness Protection
OOPSLA
DOI

Call for Papers

The OOPSLA issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages (PACMPL) welcomes papers focusing on all practical and theoretical investigations of programming languages, systems and environments. Papers may target any stage of software development, including requirements, modeling, prototyping, design, implementation, generation, analysis, verification, testing, evaluation, maintenance, and reuse of software systems. Contributions may include the development of new tools, techniques, principles, and evaluations.

NEW this year

  • OOPSLA 2022 will have two separate rounds of reviewing, with Round 1 submission deadline: October 12, 2021
  • In each round, papers will have a final outcome of Accept, Revise, or Reject—see Review Process for details.

Papers accepted at either of the rounds will be published in the 2022 volume of PACMPL(OOPSLA) and invited to be presented at the SPLASH conference in December 2022. In person attendance is not required; SPLASH will provide remote presentation options.

Review Process

PACMPL(OOPSLA) has two rounds of reviewing. The final outcome of each round can be one of Accept, Revise or Reject.

Accept: Accepted papers will appear in the 2022 volume of PACMPL(OOPSLA).

Revise: Papers in this category are invited to submit a revision to the next round of submissions with a specific set of expectations to be met. When authors resubmit, they should clearly explain how the revisions address the comments of the reviewers. The revised paper will be re-evaluated, and either accepted or rejected. Resubmitted papers will retain the same reviewers throughout the process. Papers with a Revise outcome in Round 2 and an Accept outcome in the subsequent Round 1 will appear in the 2023 volume of PACMPL(OOPSLA).

Reject: Rejected papers will not be included in the 2022 volume of PACMPL(OOPSLA). Papers in this category are not guaranteed a review if resubmitted less than one year from the date of original submission. A paper will be judged to be a resubmission if it is substantially similar to the original submission. The judgment that a paper is a resubmission of the same work is at the discretion of the Chairs.

Each round of reviewing consists of two phases. The first phase evaluates the papers and results in an early notification of Reject, Revise, or Conditional Accept. During the first phase, authors will be able to read their reviews and respond to them. The second phase is restricted to conditionally accepted papers. Authors must make a set of mandatory revisions. The second phase assesses whether the required revisions have been addressed. The outcome can be Accept, Revise or Reject.

Submissions

Submitted papers must be at most 23 pages in 10 point font. There is no page limit on references. No appendices are allowed on the main paper, instead authors can upload supplementary material with no page or content restrictions, but reviewers may choose to ignore it. The PACMPL templates used for SPLASH (Microsoft Word and LaTeX) can be found at the SIGPLAN author information page. In particular, authors using LaTeX should use the acmart-pacmpl-template.tex file (with the acmsmall option). Papers are expected to use author-year citations. Author-year citations may be used as either a noun phrase, such as “The lambda calculus was originally conceived by Church (1932)”, or a parenthetic phase, such as “The lambda calculus (Church 1932) was intended as a foundation for mathematics”.

PACMPL uses double-blind reviewing. Authors’ identities are only revealed if a paper is accepted. Papers must

  1. omit author names and institutions,
  2. use the third person when referencing your work,
  3. anonymise supplementary material.

Nothing should be done in the name of anonymity that weakens the submission; see the DBR FAQ. When in doubt, contact the Review Committee Chairs.

Papers must describe unpublished work that is not currently submitted for publication elsewhere as described by SIGPLAN’s Republication Policy. Submitters should also be aware of ACM’s Policy and Procedures on Plagiarism. Submissions are expected to comply with the ACM Policies for Authorship.

Artifacts

Authors should indicate with their initial submission if an artifact exists, describe its nature and limitations, and indicate if it will be submitted for evaluation. Accepted papers that fail to provide an artifact will be requested to explain the reason they cannot support replication. It is understood that some papers have no artifacts.

Publication

PACMPL is a Gold Open Access journal, all papers will be freely available to the public. Authors can voluntarily cover the article processing charge ($400), but payment is not required. The official publication date is the date the journal are made available in the ACM Digital Library. The journal issue and associated papers for Round 1 will be published in April 2022 and those for Round 2 in October 2022.

FAQ

Selection Criteria

We consider the following criteria when evaluating papers:

Novelty: The paper presents new ideas and results and places them appropriately within the context established by previous research.

Importance: The paper contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the field. We also welcome papers that diverge from the dominant trajectory of the field.

Evidence: The paper presents sufficient evidence supporting its claims, such as proofs, implemented systems, experimental results, statistical analyses, case studies, and anecdotes.

Clarity: The paper presents its contributions, methodology and results clearly.

Artifacts

Q: Are artifacts required?

No! It is understood that some papers have no artifacts. But if an artifact is not provided when the claims in the paper refer to an artifact, the authors must explain why their work is not available for repetition.

Q: Can a paper be accepted if the artifact is rejected?

Yes! The reasons for rejecting an artifact are multiple and often stem from the quality of the packaging.

Double-Blinding Submissions (Authors)

Q: What exactly do I have to do to anonymize my paper?

Use common sense. Your job is not to make your identity undiscoverable but simply to make it possible for reviewers to evaluate your submission without having to know who you are. The specific guidelines stated in the call for papers are simple: omit authors’ names from your title page, and when you cite your own work, refer to it in the third person. For example, if your name is Smith and you have worked on amphibious type systems, instead of saying “We extend our earlier work on statically typed toads [Smith 2004],” you might say “We extend Smith’s [2004] earlier work on statically typed toads.” Also, be sure not to include any acknowledgements that would give away your identity.

Q: Should I change the name of my system?

No.

Q: My submission is based on code available in a public repository. How do I deal with this?

Cite the code in your paper, but remove the URL and, instead say “link to repository removed for double blind review”. If you believe reviewer access to your code would help during author response, contact the Review Committee Chairs.

Q: I am submitting an extension of my workshop paper, should I anonymize reference to that work?

No. But we recommend you do not use the same title, so that it is clearly distinguishes the papers.

Q: Am I allowed to post my paper on my web page or arXiv? send it to colleagues? give a talk about it? on social media?

We have developed guidelines to help navigate the tension between the normal communication of scientific results and actions that essentially force potential reviewers to learn the identity of authors. Roughly speaking, you may discuss work under submission, but you should not broadly advertise your work through media that is likely to reach your reviewers. We acknowledge there are gray areas and trade-offs. Things you may do:

  • Put your submission on your home page.
  • Discuss your work with anyone not on the review committees or reviewers with whom you already have a conflict.
  • Present your work at professional meetings, job interviews, etc.
  • Submit work previously discussed at an informal workshop, previously posted on arXiv or a similar site, previously submitted to a conference not using double-blind reviewing, etc.

Things you should not do:

  • Contact members of the review committee about your work, or deliberately present your work where you expect them to be.
  • Publicize your work on social media if wide public [re-]propagation is common (e.g., Twitter) and therefore likely to reach potential reviewers. For example, on Facebook, a post with a broad privacy setting (public or all friends) saying, “Whew, OOPSLA paper in, time to sleep” is okay, but one describing the work or giving its title is not appropriate. Alternately, a post to a group including only the colleagues at your institution is fine.

Reviewers will not be asked to recuse themselves from reviewing your paper unless they feel you have gone out of your way to advertise your authorship information to them. If you are unsure about what constitutes “going out of your way”, please contact the Review Committee Chairs.

Double-Blind (Reviewers)

Q: What should I do if I if I learn the authors’ identity?

If at any point you feel that the authors’ actions are largely aimed at ensuring that potential reviewers know their identity, you should contact the Review Committee Chairs. Otherwise you should not treat double-blind reviewing differently from regular blind reviewing. In particular, you should refrain from seeking out information on the authors’ identity, but if you discover it accidentally this will not automatically disqualify you as a reviewer. Use your best judgment.

Q: The authors provided a URL to supplemental material, what should I do?

Contact the chairs.

Q: Can I seek an outside review?

No.

(based on the PLDI’20 DBR FAQ.)